Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival
The 46th season of the Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival at Lake Tahoe’s Sand Harbor runs from Friday, July 6 through Sunday, August 26. This year there are two featured plays – Shakespeare’s “Macbeth” and “Beehive: The 60s Musical.” There are performances every night of the week during the Festival season, including the Showcase Series of performances by a variety of artists.

Sand Harbor has been called “The Most Scenic Venue in the World,” which is fitting since it is on the shores of one of the world’s most beautiful lakes. The backdrop for the stage at Sand Harbor is Lake Tahoe. Audience seating is in a sandy bowl facing the performance and the scenic splendor of the Lake Tahoe Basin. There are a variety of seating, food, and drink options available. To reduce the parking hassle, carpooling is highly recommended as there are no public transportation options at the times of evening performances.

No pets – Animals are not allowed at Sand Harbor State Park or at the Festival. Pets may not be brought and left in the car. Pets left in cars will be removed by state park personnel and you will be fined. Service animals trained to work performing tasks for people with disabilities are not pets and are permitted. Therapy and emotional support animals are not permitted.

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4th of July fireworks, Reno, Lake Tahoe, Nevada
The 4th of July is on a Wednesday in 2018. There is lots of family fun to be had during the 4th of July holiday in Reno and Sparks. The big fireworks show in the Truckee Meadows is the Star Spangled Sparks extravaganza in Victorian Square, accompanied by a variety of activities before the sky lights up. This is a huge show and well worth seeing.

Another local fireworks show will be after the 4th of July Reno Aces game at Greater Nevada Field. The game is against the Sacramento River Cats and it starts at 6:35 p.m.

With July being Artown in Reno, there will be a free evening concert of patriotic music in Wingfield Park on the 4th of July starting at 7:30 p.m. The Reno Philharmonic Orchestra will end the performance with a choreographed fireworks show.

Up at South Lake Tahoe, “Lights on the Lake” will be particularly spectacular. The fireworks are launched from a barge out on the lake, with good vantage points all around the shoreline. Other locations around Lake Tahoe will be having fireworks shows and other activities as well, including Incline Village, Kings Beach, and Tahoe City. There will be a big party and fireworks up in Virginia City. For details about these and more, refer to “Fourth of July Fireworks in Reno, Sparks, Lake Tahoe.”

Fireworks are illegal in Washoe County – Firing off your own fireworks is illegal in Washoe County, at Lake Tahoe, and just about every other place in the surrounding region. With the hot, dry weather, this is a no brainer. Please, don’t even think about it.

The only exception to the no fireworks rule is at Pyramid Lake, where you can buy fireworks and shoot them off at designated locations within the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe Reservation and according to the rules set forth by the tribe.

Spring days are for getting outside and enjoying a hike in the Reno area. We have a wide variety of hiking and walking trails, though some of the ones up higher in the Sierra might not be open just yet due to the late snow this winter. My “Reno Area Hiking and Walking Trails” article is a good place to start when looking for a suitable trail.

Here are some of the hikes I have done and can recommend. Be sure to choose something within your abilities. Remember, this is supposed to be fun.

There are two guided hiking series taking place right now. Truckee Meadows Parks Foundation is leading “Discover Your Parks Walks” at a different park every week through September. “Walk With Washoe” is led by Washoe County staff. These outings are at various locations around the county.

Attention dog owners – It’s the law to keep dogs on leash at all times in designated congested areas of Washoe County and in Nevada State Parks. It doesn’t matter if your dog is “friendly.” Other users of public trails do not want to be approached and/or threatened by unleashed dogs. They don’t enjoy piles of dog poop all over the place, either. Be considerate of others using our trails – leash your dogs and pick up the poop.

Tahoe Meadows Trailhead, hiking, Reno, Nevada

Photo © Stan White