Radon is a radioactive, colorless, odorless and tasteless gas that comes from the ground. It accumulates in homes and can cause lung cancer. Radon kills more people than secondhand smoke, drunk driving, falls in the home, drowning and house fires combined. This type of lung cancer is preventable. The only way to know if a home has elevated levels is to test it.

Free radon test kits are available through February 28, 2018, at University of Nevada Cooperative Extension offices and partner offices statewide. Nevadans are encouraged to take advantage of this free offer to test their homes for this dangerous gas. The tests are easy to conduct. If radon is detected, there are fairly inexpensive ways to reduce the radon exposure to safe levels.

January is National Radon Action Month, and to help communities comprehend the dangers of radon, the Nevada Radon Education Program will offer presentations at various locations. Free test kits will be available at the presentations.

  • Jan. 17, 2018 – Verdi Community Library & Nature Center, 270 Bridge St., Verdi – 4 p.m.
  • Jan. 23, 2018 – Tahoe Regional Planning Agency, 128 Market St., Stateline – 6 p.m.
  • Jan. 24, 2018 – Carson City Senior Center, 911 Beverly Drive, Carson City – 6:30 p.m.
  • Feb. 7, 2018 – South Valleys Library, 15650 Wedge Parkway, Reno – 6 p.m.
  • Feb. 8, 2018 – CVIC, 1604 Esmeralda Ave., Minden – 6 p.m.
  • Feb. 15, 2018 – Storey County Senior Center, 100 Mill St., Virginia City – 12:45 p.m.
  • Feb. 21, 2018 – Incline Village GID, Public Works, 1220 Sweetwater Rd., Incline Village – 6 p.m.
  • Feb. 24, 2018 – Northwest Reno Library, 2325 Robb Drive, Reno – 2 p.m.

Learn more from “Radon Hazard in Reno Area Homes and Businesses.” Check this Nevada Statewide Radon Potential map and you’ll see that Reno and much of the surrounding area are among the highest risk zones. In fact, a home tested with the highest radon reading in Nevada was in the Reno area.

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Waste Management is hosting the free drop-off event on Saturday, November 4, 2017, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The service is available to those who have accounts in good standing. You can properly get rid of up to 50 pounds of household hazardous waste by bringing it to 1455 E. Greg Street in Sparks. Additional material will be charged at $1 per pound.

For a list of items that will be accepted, refer to the Waste Management event flyer.

This isn’t a total free-for-all. These hazardous waste materials will not be accepted.

  • Explosives
  • Asbestos
  • Biohazards (excluding sharps)
  • DEA Controlled Substances
  • Compressed Gases
  • Radioactives
  • Preserved Wood
  • Laboratory Chemicals
  • Sewage

Source: Keep Truckee Meadows Beautiful.

Beginning in May or June, the Truckee River through Reno usually flows at levels just right for tubing, rafting, and general water play on hot days. Not so this year.

The Truckee River is flowing high, fast and really cold due to continuing snowmelt from the epic snowpack dumped on the Sierra Nevada last winter. We around 200 percent of average snowfall, there’s still a lot of snow and it’s going to be a while before enough of it melts to let the river subside to lower flows. Until that happens, please heed these river safety guidelines from the Reno Fire Department.

  • River flows are extremely fast this year and river recreation by the general public is not advised at this time.
  • Consider waiting to float or swim the Truckee River until flows subside.
  • An unprepared person entering the water may experience hypothermia within several minutes, affecting their ability to swim and make decisions, leading to drowning.
  • If you do decide to go in the river, always wear a life jacket, helmet, thermal protection and sturdy shoes for river recreation.
  • Do not drink alcohol or use drugs when boating or tubing.
  • Never go into the river alone.
  • Have a plan and a rendezvous point in case you become separated.
  • Let a friend or family member know when you plan to return.

Even later in the summer, the river is likely to remain higher and colder than most people are used to. Use care and common sense to make your river play fun rather than tragic. Meanwhile, there are several public swimming pools and splash parks in Reno, Sparks and Washoe County where cooling off on hot days is a safe bet.

Truckee River, Reno, Nevada, NV

Truckee River flowing high and cold through Reno, Nevada. Photo © Stan White

Source: City of Reno press release.